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Drafts of Legal Documents

DISCLAIMER
These legal forms and documents are for reference only. Any agreement that you enter into, should be in consultation with a Solicitor or an Advocate. We will not be responsible for any claim arising out of the use of any of the below mentioned documents. To print the form, click on the desired form and use the Print button of your browser.

 Agreement For Sale

Transfer of Shares / Flats / Offices
DISCLAIMER

These legal forms and documents are for reference only. Any agreement that you enter  into, should be in consultation with a Solicitor or an Advocate. We will not be responsible for any claim   arising out of the use of any of the below mentioned documents.

To print the form, click on the desired form and use the Print button of your browser.

Reckoner

Legal Room for Real Estate

 

Legal Room for Real Estate

Taxation For Real Estate

Income Tax Rules

An overview of Income Tax Rules pertaining to properties is as under:

(FORM 37-I): When buying a property that costs over Rs. 25,00,000, the Income Tax Act requires you to inform the Income Tax department, along with all the details of the flat you are buying. There is a prescribed form for this. The Income Tax Department has the right to purchase the flat at the same price as you have agreed to buy the flat instead of you and auction the flat in the open market. The idea behind this section of the Income Tax Act is that if the Income Authorities feel that the property has been sold below the market value then the Income Tax Department will acquire the property and sell it at the fair market value. The objective of this chapter is to try and cut out the black money transactions from property transactions. [Rule-48(K)].

SECTION 24 (2): Interest Deductions – The budget presented by the Finance Minister for the year 2001-2002, has increased the ceiling on the amount of deductions from Rs. 1,00,000/- up to Rs.1,50,000/- from an individual”s income if it is self-occupied for the interest paid for a home loan.

SECTION 54 F: The income tax act gives a person who does not own a residential house a concession to purchase one when they sell a capital asset. If you sell a capital asset, normally, you are required to pay tax on the gain in the value of the asset after indexation of the cost. If however you do not own a residential house, you can reinvest the net consideration you received from the sale of the capital asset in a house property and not pay any income tax on the gain from the sale of the capital asset. There is however a time frame within which to reinvest the funds from the gain of the sale of the capital asset.

SECTION 54: Reinvestment of House Property – An individual or HUF reinvesting the net proceeds from the sale of a house in another residential house is exempted from Capital Gains Tax u/s 54, provided the new house is purchased within 2 years after or one year prior to the date of transaction.

SECTION 139 (1) : All persons whose income is below taxable limits in occupation of immovable property exceeding 800 sq.ft. Residential Property or 125 sq.ft. Commercial Property, are required to file Form 2(C ) with the income tax (for Pune city).

SECTION 88: Repayment of the principal of a home loan up to Rs. 10,000/- is eligible for deduction under Section 88 whereby 20% (i.e. Rs.2,000) can be deducted from the total amount of tax payable.

Checklist for Buying

Before You Buy

1. The Title Report

Colloquially known as the ‘property card’ or in some places ‘saat-bara’, this is an investigation into the title of the land over a period of 30 years. It ensures the marketability of the land in the hands of the original owner. Ask for the detailed report, not merely an abbreviated certificate. This should be prepared for the seller by his lawyer & should be checked by your lawyer. If the title is not clear you can be evicted from the property at a later date.

2. Property under construction

If you are buying a new house, ask for an Allotment Letter or Development Agreement detailing the agreed price, payment & construction schedule, house plans, delivery date & builder’s liability in case of late completion or problems after possession. Make sure that the developer has clear title to the land, & that the relevant local authorities have approved the building plans. Once construction is over, ask for the completion & occupation certificates, which indicate that the building has adhered to municipal requirements. Some other costs you will incur: society formation charge, transfer charge, deposit for electricity meter, charge for registration of agreement.

3. Constructed property

Make sure that the seller has the title & possession of the property as well as the right to transfer the property. Check that the relevant approvals, if any, have been obtained from the land development/planning authority & the Income tax department. Ensure that there are no tenants & get a declaration that the property was purchased from the seller’s funds & is not mortgaged. Place a notice in the newspapers about the proposed purchase. Get a No Objection Certificate from the builder or society. Check that dues such as property tax, society, water & electricity bills etc. have been paid in full. Decide who will pay society transfer charges. Take possession of all relevant documents & also the original allotment letter, completion certificate, occupation certificate and all other documents given by the original builder.

37-I Provision And Other Procedures

Formalities in Purchase of Property

 Valuation for Real Estate

Verification of the Title of the vendor

This is the most important aspect of a purchase transaction of an immovable property and may be competently handled by a reputed lawyer/solicitor/chartered accountant etc. The verification is necessary from following two angles:

i) Validity of Title: The vendor must have a clear, valid and marketable title over the immovable property which is the subject matter of transaction. This would require a close scrutiny of documents of title produced by the vendor. The document must be a registered document.

ii) Obtaining of Non-encumbrances certificate.

3. EXECUTIVE OF “AGREEMENT TO SELL“: An “Agreement to Sell” may be executed once the contract for purchase of immovable property has been finalised. Besides that, value of the property, the “Agreement to Sell” must provide about the payment of transfer fees, stamp duty and registration fee which differs from state to state and is quite substantial. This may either be payable by vendor or the buyer or may be shared equally by the two as per the agreement. The final sale would however, be subject to buyer obtaining permission from Reserve Bank, where necessary, and seller obtaining permission of competent authority under Urban Land (Ceiling & Regulation) Act, 1976 where necessary. The “Agreement to Sell” does not require compulsory registration even if it contains recital of the payment of a part or whole of the purchase money.

Verification of the Title of the vendor

This is the most important aspect of a purchase transaction of an immovable property and may be competently handled by a reputed lawyer/solicitor/chartered accountant etc. The verification is necessary from following two angles:

i) Validity of Title: The vendor must have a clear, valid and marketable title over the immovable property which is the subject matter of transaction. This would require a close scrutiny of documents of title produced by the vendor. The document must be a registered document.

ii) Obtaining of Non-encumbrances certificate.

3. EXECUTIVE OF “AGREEMENT TO SELL”: An “Agreement to Sell” may be executed once the contract for purchase of immovable property has been finalised. Besides that, value of the property, the “Agreement to Sell” must provide about the payment of transfer fees, stamp duty and registration fee which differs from state to state and is quite substantial. This may either be payable by vendor or the buyer or may be shared equally by the two as per the agreement. The final sale would however, be subject to buyer obtaining permission from Reserve Bank, where necessary, and seller obtaining permission of competent authority under Urban Land (Ceiling & Regulation) Act, 1976 where necessary. The “Agreement to Sell” does not require compulsory registration even if it contains recital of the payment of a part or whole of the purchase money.

Frequently Asked Questions for NRI’s

Frequently Asked Questions for NRI”s

Repatriation Facilities

NRIs / PIOs can freely repatriate all current income, such as, rent, dividend, pension, interest, etc. Repatriation of all these is subject only to payment of taxes.
NRIs / PIOs can also repatriate :

An amount of upto US$ 1 million, for any purpose per calendar year from the balances in NRO account. The repatriation is subject only to payment of application taxes.
Within this annual limit of US$ 1 million per year, NRIs / PIOs can also repatriate sale proceeds of immovable properties held by them for a period of 10 years.

In case a property is sold before holding it for 10 years, the NRI / PIO can keep the sale proceeds in his NRO account for the balance period and repatriate the money after 10 years,

However, if an NRI / PIO has acquired the immovable property from inward remittances, he can remit the amount originally brought in from abroad out of the sale proceeds without any lock-in period. He can do so for upto two residential properties.

Refund of (a) application / earnest money / purchase consideration made by house-building agencies / seller on account of non-allotment of flats / plots and (b) cancellation of booking / deals for purchase of residential / commercial properties, together with interest, net of taxes, provided original payment is made out of NRE / FCNR(B) account / inward remittances.

For any other queries regarding RBI / NRI rules, login to http://www.rbi.org.in/

Legal Room for Real Estate

Legal Room for Real Estate

Taxation For Real Estate

Income Tax Rules

An overview of Income Tax Rules pertaining to properties is as under:

(FORM 37-I): When buying a property that costs over Rs. 25,00,000, the Income Tax Act requires you to inform the Income Tax department, along with all the details of the flat you are buying. There is a prescribed form for this. The Income Tax Department has the right to purchase the flat at the same price as you have agreed to buy the flat instead of you and auction the flat in the open market. The idea behind this section of the Income Tax Act is that if the Income Authorities feel that the property has been sold below the market value then the Income Tax Department will acquire the property and sell it at the fair market value. The objective of this chapter is to try and cut out the black money transactions from property transactions. [Rule-48(K)].

SECTION 24 (2): Interest Deductions – The budget presented by the Finance Minister for the year 2001-2002, has increased the ceiling on the amount of deductions from Rs. 1,00,000/- up to Rs.1,50,000/- from an individual”s income if it is self-occupied for the interest paid for a home loan.

SECTION 54 F: The income tax act gives a person who does not own a residential house a concession to purchase one when they sell a capital asset. If you sell a capital asset, normally, you are required to pay tax on the gain in the value of the asset after indexation of the cost. If however you do not own a residential house, you can reinvest the net consideration you received from the sale of the capital asset in a house property and not pay any income tax on the gain from the sale of the capital asset. There is however a time frame within which to reinvest the funds from the gain of the sale of the capital asset.

SECTION 54: Reinvestment of House Property – An individual or HUF reinvesting the net proceeds from the sale of a house in another residential house is exempted from Capital Gains Tax u/s 54, provided the new house is purchased within 2 years after or one year prior to the date of transaction.

SECTION 139 (1) : All persons whose income is below taxable limits in occupation of immovable property exceeding 800 sq.ft. Residential Property or 125 sq.ft. Commercial Property, are required to file Form 2(C ) with the income tax (for Pune city).

SECTION 88: Repayment of the principal of a home loan up to Rs. 10,000/- is eligible for deduction under Section 88 whereby 20% (i.e. Rs.2,000) can be deducted from the total amount of tax payable.

Checklist for Buying

Before You Buy

1. The Title Report

Colloquially known as the ‘property card’ or in some places ‘saat-bara’, this is an investigation into the title of the land over a period of 30 years. It ensures the marketability of the land in the hands of the original owner. Ask for the detailed report, not merely an abbreviated certificate. This should be prepared for the seller by his lawyer & should be checked by your lawyer. If the title is not clear you can be evicted from the property at a later date.

2. Property under construction

If you are buying a new house, ask for an Allotment Letter or Development Agreement detailing the agreed price, payment & construction schedule, house plans, delivery date & builder’s liability in case of late completion or problems after possession. Make sure that the developer has clear title to the land, & that the relevant local authorities have approved the building plans. Once construction is over, ask for the completion & occupation certificates, which indicate that the building has adhered to municipal requirements. Some other costs you will incur: society formation charge, transfer charge, deposit for electricity meter, charge for registration of agreement.

3. Constructed property

Make sure that the seller has the title & possession of the property as well as the right to transfer the property. Check that the relevant approvals, if any, have been obtained from the land development/planning authority & the Income tax department. Ensure that there are no tenants & get a declaration that the property was purchased from the seller’s funds & is not mortgaged. Place a notice in the newspapers about the proposed purchase. Get a No Objection Certificate from the builder or society. Check that dues such as property tax, society, water & electricity bills etc. have been paid in full. Decide who will pay society transfer charges. Take possession of all relevant documents & also the original allotment letter, completion certificate, occupation certificate and all other documents given by the original builder.

37-I Provision And Other Procedures

Formalities in Purchase of Property

 Valuation for Real Estate

Verification of the Title of the vendor

This is the most important aspect of a purchase transaction of an immovable property and may be competently handled by a reputed lawyer/solicitor/chartered accountant etc. The verification is necessary from following two angles:

i) Validity of Title: The vendor must have a clear, valid and marketable title over the immovable property which is the subject matter of transaction. This would require a close scrutiny of documents of title produced by the vendor. The document must be a registered document.

ii) Obtaining of Non-encumbrances certificate.

3. EXECUTIVE OF “AGREEMENT TO SELL“: An “Agreement to Sell” may be executed once the contract for purchase of immovable property has been finalised. Besides that, value of the property, the “Agreement to Sell” must provide about the payment of transfer fees, stamp duty and registration fee which differs from state to state and is quite substantial. This may either be payable by vendor or the buyer or may be shared equally by the two as per the agreement. The final sale would however, be subject to buyer obtaining permission from Reserve Bank, where necessary, and seller obtaining permission of competent authority under Urban Land (Ceiling & Regulation) Act, 1976 where necessary. The “Agreement to Sell” does not require compulsory registration even if it contains recital of the payment of a part or whole of the purchase money.

Verification of the Title of the vendor

This is the most important aspect of a purchase transaction of an immovable property and may be competently handled by a reputed lawyer/solicitor/chartered accountant etc. The verification is necessary from following two angles:

i) Validity of Title: The vendor must have a clear, valid and marketable title over the immovable property which is the subject matter of transaction. This would require a close scrutiny of documents of title produced by the vendor. The document must be a registered document.

ii) Obtaining of Non-encumbrances certificate.

3. EXECUTIVE OF “AGREEMENT TO SELL”: An “Agreement to Sell” may be executed once the contract for purchase of immovable property has been finalised. Besides that, value of the property, the “Agreement to Sell” must provide about the payment of transfer fees, stamp duty and registration fee which differs from state to state and is quite substantial. This may either be payable by vendor or the buyer or may be shared equally by the two as per the agreement. The final sale would however, be subject to buyer obtaining permission from Reserve Bank, where necessary, and seller obtaining permission of competent authority under Urban Land (Ceiling & Regulation) Act, 1976 where necessary. The “Agreement to Sell” does not require compulsory registration even if it contains recital of the payment of a part or whole of the purchase money.

Reckoner Procedure

 

  • Property Transfer Procedure – Procedure for Transfer of flats in co-operative societies.

Definitions

1. Housing Society means a society the object of which is to provide its members with open plots for housing, dwelling houses or flats or if open Plots, the dwelling houses or flats are already acquired, to provide it’s members common amenities and services.

2. Member means a person joining in an application for the registration of a co-operative Society which is subsequently registered or a person duly admitted to membership of a Society after registration and includes a nominal, associate or sympathiser member.

3. Associate member means a member who jointly holds a share of a society with others, but whose name does not stand first in the Share Certificate.

4. Nominal member means a member admitted to membership as such after registration in accordance with the bye-laws. It is noted that a nominal member is treated as a member of the co-operative society as held in K.K.ADHIKAR vs. T.G.KULKARNI and others 1980 C.T.J. 241.

5. Society means a co-operative society registered, or deemed to be registered, under this Act. It is to be noted that a proposed society cannot be covered under the definition as held in CNJ 196 (Bom.) 1984 in the case of Beed Dist. Central Co-op and M.P. and D. Federation vs. State of Maharashtra.

 

  • Formalities – Formalities to comply

A member, desiring to transfer his shares and interest in the capital/property of the society, shall give 15 days notice of his intention to do so to the Secretary of the Society in the prescribed form, along with the consent of the proposed transferee in the prescribed form.

On receipt of such notice, the Secretary of the Society shall place the same before the meeting of the Committee, held next after the receipt of the notice, pointing out whether the member is prima-facie eligible to transfer his shares and interest in the capital/property of the society, in view of the Provisions of Section 29(2)(1) of the Act.

In event of ineligibility of the member to transfer his shares and interest in the capital/property of the Society, the Committee shall direct the Secretary of the Society to inform the member accordingly within 3 days of the decision of the committee.

If the Committee is satisfied that the member is prima facie eligible to transfer his/her shares and interest in the capital/property of the society, the Committee shall direct the Secretary of the Society to inform the member within 3 days of the decision of the Committee to make the compliance as under:

  • To submit an application for transfer of his/her shares and interest in the capital/property of the society, in the prescribed form, along with the Share Certificate
  • To submit an application for membership of the proposed transferee in the prescribed form
  • To give valid reasons for the proposed transfer
  • To discharge all the liabilities of the society
  • To pay the transfer fee of Rs. 50/-
  • To remit entrance fee of Rs. 10/- payable by the proposed transferee
  • To pay the amount of premium at a rate to be fixed by the general body meeting not exceeding 2.5 percent of the difference between the book value of the flat and the price realised by the transfer, on transfer of his flat, or Rs. 25,000/- (Rupees Twenty-five Thousand Only) whichever is less. No additional amount by way of donation, etc. will be taken unless it is paid voluntarily by the member.
  • To submit No Objection Certificate required under any law for the time being in force or order or sanction issued by the Government, any financing agency or any authority
  • To furnish the undertaking/declaration in compliance with the provisions of any law for the time being in force, in such form as is prescribed under these bye-laws.

Note: The condition at Sr. No. (vii) above shall not apply to transfer of Shares and interest of the transferor in the capital/property of the Society to the member of his family or to his nominee or his/her legal representative.

(a) The procedure for disposal of application for transfer of shares and/or interest of members in the capital/property of the Society as laid down under the model bye-laws No. 67 shall be followed by the Secretary and the Committee of the Society.

(b) The managing committee or the General Body, as the case may be shall not refuse any application for admission to membership or transfer of shares and interest in the capital/property of the society except on the ground of non-compliance of the provisions of the Act, the Rules and the bye-laws of the society or any other law or order issued by the Government in exercise of the statutory powers vested in it.

(c) If the decision of the Committee/General body meeting as the case may be, on the application for the transfer of shares and/or interest in the capital/property of the society is not communicated to the applicant within 3 months of its receipt, the transfer application shall be deemed to have been accepted and the transferee shall be deemed to have been admitted as a member of the society as provided under Section 22(2) of the Act.

(d) Any transfer made in contravention of the Act, Rules or the bye-laws will be void and will not be effective against the society.

The transferee shall be eligible to exercise the rights of membership on receipt of the letter in the prescribed form from the society.

-By Vimal Punmiya, B. Com, L.L.B.(Gen), F.C.A.

  • Tenant & Tenancy Procedure – Minding The Tenants You Keep

Property owners often worry that tenants will be like the camel that asked the Arab for shelter only to nudge him out of his tent by morning.
With various state rent control laws yet to be amended in order to be more equitable for property owners, an extra dose of caution is called for before handing over the keys. In the light of innumerable instances of tenants” sub-letting premises, using the pugree system or going to court to take advantage of long-winded litigation procedures, here are some pointers to make sure that rent income does not insidiously change to cost. Here, the rules of the game partially depend on who the other side is – a company lessor or individual tenant.

Vet the company. No point leasing to a company that is broke. Big names do not automatically imply a model tenant. Sniff around for a good track record of timely payments.

The company”s nominee occupant should be named. If the employee quits during the lease period, the flat should revert promptly to the owner.

Push for a copy of the occupant”s employment contract, which specifies the contract period.

The Company must give a corporate guarantee from its head office ensuring that the flat is handed over at the end of the lease. In case, the guarantee is not available take a letter of comfort from the concerned branch office, which will act as proof that the company has rented the house.

Sound legalese in drawing up the contract is a must.

Specify that subletting is prohibited irrespective of whether it is a company or individual lease.

While big corporates may prefer a three-five year lease, residence owners usually prefer the relative safety of a leave-and-license agreement, which ensures periodic renewal of the terms. The eleven-month agreement is usually popular as these pre-empt the rent control laws, which apply after 12 months. Rent control laws, as said earlier, weigh in favor of tenants.

Specify the notice period for either side.

Property, where rent is over Rs. 3,500 is subject to the Transfer of Property Act (TPA) and not the rent control laws of the various states and metros. The TPA comes under the civil court while the rent laws are heard by the Rent Controller at the district level. If you want to evict errant tenants the TPA is much better as it has a broad scope for eviction unlike the latter which sets out barely 12 causes.

There is a silver lining yet for harried landlords. If passed, Delhi”s pending Rent Control Bill would enable house owners to remove tenants who have stayed for over 10 years without paying market rates. Section 13A2 was introduced in the Bombay Rent Act a couple of years ago which allows the landlord to double the rent if the tenant does not vacate or is ruining the property. Its advocates also say that if the Urban Land Ceiling Regulation Act is abolished, landlords would be on firmer ground. There”s still hope for all property owners!

Courtesy: indiainfoline.com

Stamp Duty

 

A listing of Stamp Duty values for properties in Mumbai.

Residential

Maharashtra New Stamp Duty Rates on Instruments relating to Sale of Property in a Co-operative Housing Society, Etc. are as follows : Remarks
within Municipal limits of Greater Mumbai,Navi Mumbai, Pune & Thane.

If relating premises registered under Maharashtra Co-operative Societies Act, 1960, or the Maharashtra Ownership Flat Act, 1963, or the Maharashtra Apartment Ownership Act, 1970

Where the value of property does not exceed Rs.2,50,000/- Rs.100

Where the value of property exceeds Rs.2,50,000/- but does not exceed Rs.5,00,000/- Rs.100 plus 3% of the value above Rs.2,50,000/-

Where the value of property exceeds Rs.5,00,000/- Rs.7,600 plus 5% of the value above Rs.5,00,000/-

On the market value or the agreement value whichever is higher.

 

FROM 7TH MAY, 2005 ONWARDS STAMP DUTY ON LEAVE & LICENCE AGREEMENT SHALL BE APPLICABLE AS FOLLOWS :
12 MONTHS 24 MONTHS 36 MONTHS 48 MONTHS 60 MONTHS
Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential
A) Where the amount of Average Annual Rent plus Security Deposit or Money Advanced or to be Advanced is Rs. 1 to Rs. 2,50,000/- 750/- 1,500/- 2,250/ 3,000/- 3,750/-
B) Where the amount of Average Annual Rent plus Security Deposit or Money Advanced or to be Advanced is Rs. 2,51,000/- to Rs. 5,00,000/- 1,500/- 3,000/- 4,500/- 6,000/- 7,500/-
C) Where the amount of Average Annual Rent plus Security Deposit or Money Advanced or to be Advanced is Rs. 5,01,000/- to Rs. 20,00,000/- 3,000/- 6,000/- 9,000/- 12,000/- 15,000/-
D) Where the amount of Average Annual Rent plus Security Deposit or Money Advanced or to be Advanced is Rs. 20,00,000/- & Above 5,000/- 10,000/- 15,000/- 20,000/- 25,000/-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FROM 7TH MAY, 2005 ONWARDS STAMP DUTY ON LEAVE & LICENCE AGREEMENT SHALL BE APPLICABLE AS FOLLOWS :
12 MONTHS 24 MONTHS 36 MONTHS 48 MONTHS 60 MONTHS
Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial
A) Where the amount of Average Annual Rent plus Security Deposit or Money Advanced or to be Advanced is Rs. 1 to Rs. 2,50,000/- 1,500/- 3,000/- 4,500/- 6,000/- 7,500/-
B) Where the amount of Average Annual Rent plus Security Deposit or Money Advanced or to be Advanced is Rs. 2,51,000/- to Rs. 5,00,000/- 3,000/- 6,000/- 9,000/- 12,000/- 15,000/-
C) Where the amount of Average Annual Rent plus Security Deposit or Money Advanced or to be Advanced is Rs. 5,01,000/- to Rs. 20,00,000/- 6,000/- 12,000/- 18,000/- 24,000/- 30,000/-
D) Where the amount of Average Annual Rent plus Security Deposit or Money Advanced or to be Advanced is Rs. 20,00,000/- & Above 10,000/- 20,000/- 30,000/- 40,000/- 50,000/-

 

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Please find below a few helpful links

 

India Real Estate

URL: http://www.magicbricks.com/

Description : Buy sell and rent residential and commercial properties in India like houses, flats, shops, apartments, land, farm house, office space, plots, guest house and get fair deals by property dealers, agents or real estate brokers.

Mortgages UK Comparisons

URL:http://www.FancyAMortgage.co.uk/
Description : Fancy A Mortgage.co.uk offers information, comparisons and guides to UK Mortgages .

Dubai Real Estate

URL:http://www.homeguru.ae/
Description : HOME GURU provide Comprehensive Services for Leasing/Buying and Selling Residential & Commercial Property in Dubai, Sharjah and Ajman.

History of Bandra
History of Bandra
Bandra was a tiny fishing village inhabited Kolis (fishermen) and farmers.It was acquired by the British East India Company while the rest of Bombay belonged to the Portuguese.There was an 18 hole golf course in Bandra called Danda Green with an English style Club House on the top of the hill, surrounded by trees. Membership was only for the British who lived in Pali Hill.. Each cottage had a stable for horses.Bandra consisted of the villages Sherly, Malla, Rajan, Kantwady, Waroda, Ranwar, Boran,Pali and Chuim. Ranwar also had a tennis court and the famous Ranwar Club famous for its Christmas and New Year eve dances.Most adults in Bandra worked for the East India Company and hence were called East Indians. In the Bandra of the forties and earlier , large cottages with large gardens were available for rent at Rs 30 a month.Marriages were celebrated for 8 days from Thursday to Thursday for a Sunday wedding and the whole village was invited. Thursday was pig slaughter day and Friday was to make pappads for drinks, Saturday to make fugias and bring water from the village well to bathe the bride or groom. Sunday was the wedding ceremony and long reception.. Monday was day of rest and to finish remaining food and on Tuesday the feet of guests were washed in exchange for cash. Then farewell dinner on Wed and guests left on Thursday by which time honeymoon was over.Tradition has it that the suburb was originally known as Vandra or Ape as it was the home of monkeys, then Bandor as the Portuguese called it in 1505, then called Bandera, Bandura, Bandore, Pandara, Bandorah, Bandara and finally Bandra till a railway sign board finalized it at the end of the last century. Salsette was originally separated by a tidal creek which Portuguese called Bandora creek. English changed it to Mahim creek.Bandra had 2 hills, Mount Mary hill and Pali hill. On 12th Apr 1867 the first railway service was inaugurated with one train per day between Virar and Bombay. Bandra at one time was peopled mainly by East Indians (original residents of Bombay Salsette, Bassein, and Thana), a few Goans and Manglorian immigrants, Parsis, Muslims, Europeans and Hindu Kolis. Till as late as the 30″s Bandra had only one bus service from Pali Naka, Hill road to the Rly station. Other people just walked to the nearest Rly station. After World War II the building boom started to accommodate immigrants.The five oldest roads in Bandra are as follows :Godbunder Rd, which originally ran from Mahim causeway, then skirted Bazaar Rd, went past the Bandra talab (lake) and continued to Godbunder. The Road was later made straight by cutting through the talab.Bazaar Rd began at Godbunder Rd opposite the mosque and ran through the market keeping close to the coast which is now the reclamation.Hill Rd starting from the station went through middle of Bandra town, past St Andrews to terminate at the foot of the Mount near Mehboob studio. Pali Rd began at St Peters and cut through Pali village till it reached Danda.BJ Rd runs from St Andrews to Lands End, was built by Byramjee Jeejebhoy and opened to public in 1878.There are over 150 crosses at various places. Many crosses were built to ward off the plague epidemic (1896-1906).The oldest is the one relocated in St Andrew”s church compound. Stands 17ft high and made of a single stone. It was originally in the Jesuit seminary of St Anne built in 1610. The bldg was destroyed in 1739 and the cross was relocated to St Andrews church. The surface is carved all over with 39 emblems of the passion of Christ. Bazaar Rd is only 2 km long but houses a Jain temple, Ram Mandir, Hanuman temple, Khoja mosque, Christian chapel and a Sikh gurduwara.Main roads in Bandra, Perry, Carter, Bullock, Kane, and Bates were named after British collectors and magistrates. Mr Carter was collector in 1924 and Mr Bullock was the Chief Magistrate. Christians in Bandra are mostly of the Koli, Bhandari and Kunbi castes.. The architect of Mount Mary”s church was a Bombay architect Shahpoorjee Chandabhoy. The basilica was built in 1904 at a cost of 1 lakh. Also the first time a non catholic was asked to build the church. It was built to serve the garrison posted at Castella de Aguada- the fort at Land”s End road. It was destroyed in a fire in 1739 and rebuilt in 1761, the year marking beginning of Bandra feast as it is celebrated today.The walls enclosing the compound of St Andrew”s church were built by a Parsi, Manockjee Sorabjee Ashburner in 1862. It is recorded on a slab on the main gate of the enclosure.. In 1879, Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy constructed a flight of steps from foot of Mt Mary hill to north side of church known as the degrados de bomanjee (steps of Bomanjee).St Stanislaus started in 1863 as a “Native Boy”s orphanage”, became a high school in 1923 and was the first English medium school in the suburbs.In 1661 when King Charles married Catherina of Portugal, Bombay was given to England as part of the dowry.. Salsette was not part of this treaty and remained with the Portuguese. In 1739 with the threat of a Maratha invasion, the Portuguese appealed to the British for help and they suggested to the Portuguese to destroy all fortifications around the chapel and the fortress Aguada. However the Marathas took over and ruled for 2 decades. But after the battle of Panipat in 1761, Maratha power declined and the British took over and Salsette including Bandra came under British rule. The Portuguese were left with just Goa, Daman and Diu..The English found in this newly acquired territory of Salsette thousands of Indian families who were converted to Christianity.. It was from these families the English drew their supplies of clerks, assistants and secretaries. At that time there was hardly a Hindu, Parsi or Muslim who could read Roman characters. There was also a large influx of Christians from Goa, Karnataka and Kerala and this prompted local converts to take the name of “East Indians” and form the East Indian Association on 26th May 1887 to distinguish the “sons of the soil” who were the first employees of the East India Company, from Indian Christians who came from further down the West coast and shared the same names and religion, and vied for the same jobs. Crossing the Mahim creek was by ferry to the industrial town of Bombay. After many boats capsized, a road was built by Lady Jamsethji in 1843 at a cost of Rs1, 55,800. It was designed by Lt..Crawford and opened to public in 1845.Railway started in 1867 with one train but 6 yrs later it was increased to 24 each day and now 940 trains that stop at Bandra every day.The Tata Agiary on Hill Rd was built by Tata in memory of his wife in 1884.